Panthers on the Prowl

hssanya:

Did you know that after they switched to blind auditions, major symphony orchestras hired women between 30% to 55% more? Before bringing in “blind auditions” with a screen to conceal the the candidate, women in the top 5 major orchestras made up less than 5% of the musicians performing.

(via politicalmachine)

In a study of children aged 2-5, parents interrupted their daughters more than their sons, and fathers were more likely to talk simultaneously with their children than mothers were. Jennifer Coates says: “It seems that fathers try to control conversation more than mothers… and both parents try to control conversation more with daughters than with sons. The implicit message to girls is that they are more interruptible and that their right to speak is less than that of boys.”

Girls and boys’ differing understanding of when to talk, when to be quiet, what is polite and so on, has a visible impact on the dynamics of the classroom. Just as men dominate the floor in business meetings, academic conferences and so on, so little boys dominate in the classroom - and little girls let them.

X  (via albinwonderland)

this explains my dad so hard.

and also i feel vindicated in my former one woman campaign to dominate classroom discussions, because i definitely got a lot of women talking when they realized that the professor listened to me as much as the guys.

(via minionier)

(Source: geviladaheel, via politicalmachine)

policymic:

Thai protesters seen using the hand gesture from ‘The Hunger Games’

Life imitates art again as demonstrators against Thailand’s military government have apparently adopted The Hunger Games’ three-finger salute as a sign of rebellion. It’s the same salute that protesters in The Hunger Games use as a silent challenge to the miserable government of Panem

Read more | Follow policymic

(Source: micdotcom, via popculturebrain)

skunkbear:

It seems like the title of an onion article, but it’s actually very serious. A study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that hurricanes with feminine names killed significantly more people than hurricanes with masculine names.  The authors looked at several decades of hurricane deaths (excluding extreme outliers like Katrina and Audrey) and posed a question: 

Do people judge hurricane risks in the context of gender-based expectations?

 According to their study, the answer is a big yes.

Laboratory experiments indicate that this is because hurricane names lead to gender-based expectations about severity and this, in turn, guides respondents’ preparedness to take protective action.

In other words, because of some deep-seated perceptions of gender, people are less afraid of hurricanes with feminine names. And that means they are less likely to evacuate.

(via npr)

marchingjaybird:

Some genius replaced the music in the Party Rock video with the cantina song from Star Wars and it matches perfectly

(via lilm0m0)

breakingnews:

Google releases diversity statistics; workforce mostly white, male
Gigaom: Google released a breakdown of the company’s diversity in both gender and ethnicity, showing that its workforce is 70 percent male and 61 percent white.
Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations, said in a blog post that Google is actively trying to recruit more women and minorities for its staff, but “we’re the first to admit that Google is miles from where we want to be — and that being totally clear about the extent of the problem is a really important part of the solution.”
Google and other tech companies have been pressured to release diversity numbers.

breakingnews:

Google releases diversity statistics; workforce mostly white, male

Gigaom: Google released a breakdown of the company’s diversity in both gender and ethnicity, showing that its workforce is 70 percent male and 61 percent white.

Laszlo Bock, senior vice president of people operations, said in a blog post that Google is actively trying to recruit more women and minorities for its staff, but “we’re the first to admit that Google is miles from where we want to be — and that being totally clear about the extent of the problem is a really important part of the solution.”

Google and other tech companies have been pressured to release diversity numbers.